sircuddlebuns:

Skip the Use - Nameless World

I AM SO IN LOVE WITH THIS! THE SONG AND THE ANIMATION ARE SO GOOD I AM HAVING AN OUT OF BODY EXPERIENCE PLEASE WATCH THIS YOU WILL NOT BE SORRY

(via cutesoylatte)

giancarlovolpe:

A little behind the scenes look of the early stages of Green Lantern the Animated Series.

My eternal gratitude to everyone who helped prove the doubters wrong.

fuckyeahillustrativeart:

pxlbyte:

Monument Valley is Out Today!

Written by Elliott Finn

Remember that stunning, Escher-inspired puzzle game for iOS that you saw the trailer for a few months ago? Well, you can play it right now!

(Click here for the full article)

image

(via hydrajen)

(via chinese chicken congee recipe | use real butter)
I’m drooling right now.

(via chinese chicken congee recipe | use real butter)

I’m drooling right now.

rek:

sleeperdragons:

Artist Wages. FlightRising-ified

stigmarising:

Here, I did all the wages according to averages across the United States for work in the art field, as well as freelance artists. I included the United States Federal Minimum Wage, as well as the Washington State…

I know the original poster is talking about Dragon commission but if you guys are serious about Freelancing…

I don’t really have the brain power to make a completely comprehensive post but I’m really tired of seeing people get so zeroed in on minimum wage when it comes to pricing their creative work/freelancing.

Yes, you should be paid at least a livable wage for your work but Sam hell people. Your skill/personal flair/ideas/imagination/time spent observing and analyzing that translates to more effective visual communication/technical prowess and knowledge of a medium are a commodity. Or at least, they should be if you want to be the least bit successful.

At the very base of what you’re considering charging should be a livable wage and here’s some other things to think about as well:

-          Consider how much you want to make doing what you do. For a whole year. How much does that actually come to? How much of that is spent living? (Food/shelter/transportation/other miscellaneous things because life can get expensive) Because you should be making more than THAT. How much do you want to save every year? This all adds up to what you should be considering you should charge per hour.

-          How much time do you have for said Creative work? Less time means your time is more precious. In other words, it is worth more.

-          How much do your materials cost? This should be a cost that is padded into your price, you shouldn’t be bleeding money just because you do something that appears fun to others or just because you’re passionate about it.

-           How much demand is there for your work? There’s nothing wrong with upping your price to limit the demand. Art is fairly subjective at its core which means its assigned value is also partially subjective. You should also consider having a set goal price that you are raising yourself to overtime if you find that you just starting out/inexperienced.

-          How much to other charge for their work? Do they consider themselves professionals? Do you want to be considered a professional? Are you undercutting others in your field? If you have any love for what you’re doing, you shouldn’t be undermining the efforts for others to make a living off of it.

-          Are you advertising, social networking, making time for meeting with clients or doing the otherwise business side of the art too? That part of the work should get paid for too.

EXTRA NOTE: by the way dear freelancers, the self employment tax rate in the U.S. currently is 15.3% of your net income.

sleeperdragons:

Artist Wages. FlightRising-ified

stigmarising:

Here, I did all the wages according to averages across the United States for work in the art field, as well as freelance artists. I included the United States Federal Minimum Wage, as well as the Washington State…

I know the original poster is talking about Dragon commission but if you guys are serious about Freelancing…

I don’t really have the brain power to make a completely comprehensive post but I’m really tired of seeing people get so zeroed in on minimum wage when it comes to pricing their creative work/freelancing.

Yes, you should be paid at least a livable wage for your work but Sam hell people. Your skill/personal flair/ideas/imagination/time spent observing and analyzing that translates to more effective visual communication/technical prowess and knowledge of a medium are a commodity. Or at least, they should be if you want to be the least bit successful.

At the very base of what you’re considering charging should be a livable wage and here’s some other things to think about as well:

-          Consider how much you want to make doing what you do. For a whole year. How much does that actually come to? How much of that is spent living? (Food/shelter/transportation/other miscellaneous things because life can get expensive) Because you should be making more than THAT. How much do you want to save every year? This all adds up to what you should be considering you should charge per hour.

-          How much time do you have for said Creative work? Less time means your time is more precious. In other words, it is worth more.

-          How much do your materials cost? This should be a cost that is padded into your price, you shouldn’t be bleeding money just because you do something that appears fun to others or just because you’re passionate about it.

-           How much demand is there for your work? There’s nothing wrong with upping your price to limit the demand. Art is fairly subjective at its core which means its assigned value is also partially subjective. You should also consider having a set goal price that you are raising yourself to overtime if you find that you just starting out/inexperienced.

-          How much to other charge for their work? Do they consider themselves professionals? Do you want to be considered a professional? Are you undercutting others in your field? If you have any love for what you’re doing, you shouldn’t be undermining the efforts for others to make a living off of it.

-          Are you advertising, social networking, making time for meeting with clients or doing the otherwise business side of the art too? That part of the work should get paid for too.

 

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Themed by: Hunson